A second chance

Transplantation - a second chance

For people who suffer the failure of one or more of their organs, transplants can offer new hope. In the UK, 3,513 organ transplants were carried out, thanks to the generosity of 1,854 donors, in the year up to the end of March 2009  (Source:NHS Blood and Transplant).

The most common transplants are of kidneys, with 2,536 patients receiving a kidney, pancreas or combined kidney/pancreas transplant in the year to April 2009 (Source:NHS Blood and Transplant).

Hearts, livers and lungs are also regularly transplanted and further medical advances are leading to transplants of other organs. Thousands more have their sight restored through cornea transplants.

As more and more people can be considered for transplants, the shortage of donors becomes ever more acute. Some people who need transplants have to wait for years. Many others die before an organ becomes available.

Donated organs originate from people who have died, but the number of living people donating a kidney or a segment of their liver or lung is increasing. A third of kidney transplants now come from live donors (Source:NHS Blood and Transplant).

At Roche, we are acutely aware of the challenges of transplantation for the people involved: from those who are waiting for transplants and the people who live with transplanted organs to the teams of healthcare professionals who care for them. This awareness focuses our efforts as we strive to discover and develop even better diagnostic tools and therapies for transplantation.